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OS X Security Lapses

Who says that Microsoft has all the hackers and crackers problem? In recent years , this has been the selling point of most non Microsoft OS. Partially , they are right. LINUX and UNIX has been consistent in this field but what about Apple? I could not blame the designers of Microsoft , the patches are always there, but its the price to pay for being so famous to end users ..making it more interesting to hackers. This is not in defense of the Bill Gates company , just a reflection on how much other OS firms have considered their security features.

Here is a nice article in a blog i read named Digital Binary ( a good blog ) about security issues regarding the new OS X from Aple. Read on....
Booming of Apple’s Mac OS X signals all the hacker to shift their eyes on them. Less security compared to current UNIX and the current transition plan into Intel architecture will just make it worse.

OS X platform are based on UNIX that are less vulnerable compared to windows platform. Yet OS X seems forgetting to put security measure that UNIX has done in twenty-years past and make it more vulnerable than UNIX these days.

"This is almost certainly the year of the OS X exploit," said Jay Beale, a senior security consultant for Intelguardians and an expert in hardening Linux and Mac OS X systems. "The OS X platform may be based on a Unix platform, but Apple seems to be making mistakes that Unix made, and corrected, long ago."

Apple also has been widely criticized for not talking about the details of its vulnerability-response process or how it manages security incidents. While Microsoft has the lion's share of security problems--and the Mac OS X hardly any--the Redmond, Wash., based software giant has received high marks from security researchers for its responsiveness, while Apple has often been the focus of complaints.

"On a good day, Apple doesn't even make it to Microsoft's level of security awareness," Beale said.


"No matter how good your security platform is, negligence and misjudgement can bring it down."


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